Same Game – Different Name

I thought I’d finish off 2014 by posting a simple game to use as a review in Bible Class.

Well, at least I assumed it would be simple!

XsandOs

A woman named Debbie (Arizona, USA) emailed me awhile back with the suggestion of adapting an “X and O” game into a review activity for Bible Class.   Children list words and ideas and then play a game similar to “tic-tac-toe” or “noughts and crosses”.  The example in the picture above is from the Bible lesson Conquering the Land and Fighting Giants.

I thought such a simple idea would be easy to explain until I began filming a “how-to” video and writing out instructions.  Hopefully, the final result makes sense. Click here to learn how to use the game in your Bible Class.

Same Game-Different Name

It turns out that many of us play the game but we know it by different names.  That’s why I stuck with the simple title of “X and O Review Game“.  Here are some of the other names listed by Wikipedia:

  • Tick-tack-toe, Tic-tac-toe, Tick-tat-toe, or Tit-tat-toe (USA, Canada)
  • Noughts and crosses or Naughts and crosses (United Kingdom, Republic of Ireland, Australia, New Zealand, South Africa)
  • Exy-Ozys, Xsie-Osies (verbal name only) (Northern Ireland)
  • Xs and Os (Egypt, Republic of Ireland, Canada, Zimbabwe, Romania)
  • O-X (Mauritius)

qml-tic-tac-toe-example

Older Than You Think

I was amazed to find out that In fact, 1st Century Romans played a version of this game that was very similar to what we play today!  So this game has been played since the time of Christ.

Same Same but Different

As my Thai friends say, “same-same but different”.  God’s Word does not change but it is shared in different languages and and by various methods that fit the culture and understanding of the hearer.  You know the needs of the children you are teaching.  I’m hoping you are reading the ideas on www.missionbibleclass.org and then adapting them to your own teaching situation and language.

If a simple and inconsequential game of “X and O” can still be played and enjoyed by adults and children century after century then how much more lasting is the Word of God for all people for all time?

Hand-prints for All Ages

Multi-age handprints

I love reading about the bible character, Caleb.  He served God his entire life.

Caleb and Joshua were the two spies that brought a good report back to Moses in the story Twelve Tribes and Twelve Spies.  Then, when he is an old man we read about him in The Land is Conquered and Caleb Fights the Giants.  Caleb did not let age stop him from fighting the battles needed to conquer the promised land.

When you teach this story invite some older Christian brother and sisters to attend your class and spend time with the children.  Ask the guests to talk about their faith and how they serve God.  They could talk about their prayer life or show photos of things they have done in their life.

Another way to help children and older people relate to each other is to have them participate in an activity together.  Hand-prints are easy and fun!

Supplies for Handprints:

  • Paper  (or use this template)
  • Washable paint such as tempera paint
  • Plate or other flat container to hold the paint (like a paper plate)
  • Paint brush or cloth
  • Damp towel to wipe the paint off  when finished

Instructions:

  1. Pour paint in flat container
  2. Apply paint to hand with paintbrush or cloth
  3. Press hand on paper and lift off carefully
  4. Repeat for each person making a print
  5. Set aside to dry
  6. Be sure and make two sets so that both the older person and the child can keep a copy.

Other Bible Stories for this Craft: