You Git What You Git

Contentment_happy faceI was recently entertaining some children at a church in Texas while their parents were in a meeting.  We were playing a game where picture cards were passed out.  Some of the children began to complain that the cards they had been dealt were not as good as the ones the other children had received.  One child even reached out and took what he considered a “better” card away from a smaller child.

Just as I was about to sit everyone down for a little lecture about fair play and kindness one of the younger children stopped everyone in their tracks by piping up with the perfect reminder in a very thick Texas accent, “You ‘git’ what you ‘git’ so don’t throw a fit.”

Oh, how we all need to be reminded to be content with what we have!  I later learned about a children’s book with the title “You Get What You Get” but an even earlier source might be something Paul wrote in Philippians 4:11-12…

…for I have learned to be content whatever the circumstances.  I know what it is to be in need, and I know what it is to have plenty.  I have learned the secret of being content in any and every situation, whether well fed or hungry, whether living in plenty or in want.

This is certainly not just a lesson for children. How often do we say things like:

  • If only I had a classroom I could be a good teacher.
  • I wish those other people would start teaching.
  • Why don’t my church leaders ever thank me?
  • What!  Only one child came today?  Why can’t I have a big class like that other church?

It is a lesson for me.  “I ‘git’ what I ‘git’ so I won’t throw a fit!”

Helping Children Understand Contentment

Contentment has long been something that has eluded mankind.  The Israelites certainly dealt with this after they left the “comforts” of Egypt and followed Moses into the wilderness.

In teaching the story of the Bronze Snake on a Pole I love to help the children role-play various situations where they must be content with what they have.  My favourite scenario is a birthday party.  We pretend that we are at a birthday party opening presents.  I take the first turn and act out being “discontent” by pretending to open a gift from my grandmother and saying “Oh, no!  I didn’t want the doll with the PINK dress.  I wanted the one with the PURPLE dress.”  (I lose all pride when I teach so I add a lot of drama.  The children love it.)

We then discuss how the grandmother might feel.  I carry on the discussion talking about how some little girls might not even have a birthday gift.    After discussing this I act out the scene again modelling contentment and thanking my grandmother for the gift.  Usually all of the children want to take a turn at being the one opening a gift.

It is my prayer that the children I teach will learn to apply this lesson of contentment to other life situations just as the little boy I told you about.  This is such an important life lesson.  No matter where they go and what they do in life the children will “git what they git”.

This entry was posted in 02. Bronze Snake on a Pole, 1.OLD Testament, Application and Review, C.Exodus through the 12 Spies, Role Play and tagged , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

3 Responses to You Git What You Git

  1. Karen says:

    Thank you Mary! I am encouraged to hear how situations workout with little ones teaching great lessons. It helps me keep my ears open to the workings of our Lord in the lives of the little ones he has placed in my life and classroom.

  2. Vicki Gore says:

    Great post, Mary! So true.
    I think of you each week as I use your curriculum as the base of the lessons I compile for one of our classes. We’re using The Tower of Babel through Joseph section this quarter. Thanks for the hours you spent developing the project.

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